10K Training Plan

So you’ve been running 5k’s for a while and now it’s time for the next step. Follow our beginners 10K training plan right here! Feel free to switch the days to suit you but do leave rest days in between each run.

“If you want to become the best runner you can be, start now. Don’t spend the rest of your life wondering if you could do it”
(Priscilla Welsh)

5k to 10k Training Plan

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
Week 1 Rest or cross train Easy Run 30-35mins Rest or cross train Easy Run
30-35mins
Rest Rest or cross train Easy Run 5.5-7.5km
Week 2 Rest or cross train Easy Run 30-35mins Rest or cross train Easy Run
30-35mins
Rest Rest or cross train Easy Run
6-8km
Week 3 Rest or cross train Easy Run 35-40mins Rest or cross train Steady Run
35-40mins
Rest Rest or cross train Easy/Steady 6.5-8.5km
Week 4 Rest or cross train Easy Run 35-40mins Rest or cross train Steady Run
35-40mins
Rest Rest or cross train Easy/Steady 7-9km
Week 5 Rest or cross train Easy Run 40-45mins Rest or cross train Steady Run
35-40mins
Rest Rest or cross train Easy/Steady 7.5-9.5km
Week 6 Rest or cross train Easy Run 40-45mins Rest or cross train Steady Run
35-40mins
Rest Rest or cross train Easy/Steady 8-10km
Week 7 Rest or cross train Easy Run 45-50mins Rest or cross train Steady Run
35-40mins
Rest Rest or cross train Easy/Steady 8.5-10km
Week 8 Rest or cross train Easy Run 45-50mins Rest or cross train Steady Run
35-40mins
Rest Rest or cross train Easy/Steady 9-10km
Week 9 Rest or cross train Easy Run 50-55mins Rest or cross train Steady Run
35-40mins
Rest Rest The BIG DAY! 😊
Adapted from the 5-10k programme from the University of Leeds Sports Department https://sport.leeds.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/5K-to-10K-programme-for-website-article-1.docx

What do we mean?

Easy running”

This is your easiest running pace above a walk. It is the pace you can speak whole sentences at and maintain a conversation with a good breath!

For example, if you reach a hill and your breathing rate increases then slow down or walk.

You are listening to feedback from your body and at no point is the pace pushed or forced.

Steady running”

Often referred to as moderate, a steady pace is one where you can converse in brief sentences if needed.

Your focus will be more on maintaining the slightly higher level of effort. Your breathing rate will be higher than with easy running but not exhaustive.

Remember we are not using maximum efforts, so listen to your body’s feedback.

 

  • Cross-Train – take a walk or a cycle or carry out strengthening exercises. No running permitted!
  • Rest – you could take a walk on your day off, just make sure you keep the exertion to a minimum to reap the benefit from the rest day
  • Tuesday run: This easy run is your endurance building block- this will increase your fitness
  • Thursday run: As you build up the time, by week 5 the duration levels off so that you can focus on improving your pace during this run
  • Sunday run: This is your longer run. Anywhere within the target km range is good. When you’re training for a longer event, running by distance is an important part of training. It can tell you a lot about your fitness level and can help you better understand your pace per kilometre
  • The pace options changes from week 5 to allow for more advanced runners to perform the weekend distance run at a steady pace. Decide based on how you and your body are feeling as to whether you will complete this longer run at an easy or steady pace.

 

Most importantly, enjoy the training sessions!